Thursday, 30 May 2013

Scent trail


Nigel Slater's list of favourite scents:

moss
snow
dim sum
beeswax
old books
cardamom
warm flapjacks
a roasting chicken
a freshly snapped runner bean
cress seeds sprouting on wet blotting paper
a whiff of white narcissi on a freezing winter's day

Mine:

apple wood smoke
lily of the valley
wet nasturtiums
privet flowers
garam masala
lime blossom
wallflowers
new carpet
lemon zest
new bread
bluebells
cut grass
creosote
mimosa
saffron
vanilla
WD40
gorse

Yours?






28 comments:

  1. Weird I know. I don't make a habit of inhaling it though!

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  2. Gosh - I didn't know privet flowers HAD a scent! I must sniff my hedge more often.
    I think I would have to add good French soap to the list...

    Penny
    x

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    Replies
    1. Yes I forgot to put Roger & Gallet carnation soap.

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  3. Horses, clean babies and a warm, sleepy cat........

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  4. Tea tree oil, pine sap, oranges, marjoram, sheets dried on the line.....

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    Replies
    1. Also pine sap or Christmas trees should have been there.

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  5. White freesia, lilac, dill, mint, and viburnum
    and old bookstores for just a few -
    Mary

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    Replies
    1. Ditto freesias, lilac and mint.

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  6. Roast chicken, dampness at night as dusk falls, summer hay cutting, sheep, cattle, cat fur behind the ears, my grandmother, my other grandparents' drawing room, those purple photocopies we were given at school, the pages of a new book, fresh carrots, rising dough...

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    Replies
    1. Summer hay definitely.

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    2. Mimeograph! Me, too!
      (Boy, are we old :)

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  7. roses
    leather
    lemons
    lavender
    the beach
    1st coffee
    puppy breath
    new cut grass
    (that was harder than it looked :))

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    Replies
    1. Lavender but especially while still in a field.

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  8. Lavendar, babies' heads, old books, fresh bread, lilacs, lemongrass, basil, tomato leaves, baked apples, freshly cut Christmas trees, gingerbread, lake shores, the ocean, cottonwood buds, alpine meadows, My parents' kitchen, etc., etc., etc.

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    Replies
    1. How did I forget tomato leaves when pinching out the side shoots?

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    2. You were most likely on 'sensory overload' :)
      How could I forget coffee, and I have this lovely new lemon drop rooibos tea which smells heavenly also.

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  9. Vanilla, woodsmoke, Lily of the Valley, chocolate cake baking, Ysatis by Givenchy, oranges, the smell of a freshly opened jar of coffee.......

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  10. Coffee! It's on the list. Don't know Ysatis, but still love my Jo Malone Red Roses. Or rather other people do and frequently comment even if I can't smell it once on me.

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  11. Fressias, sweet peas, newly cut grass, the sea, roses, basil, woodsmoke, old books, dark chocolate, christmas trees, old churches, pavements after rain. Also an almost undefinable smell you get on a sunny spring and summer day, its a sweet, pollen-y smell.

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  12. Seems to me that if I give my list I will be giving away a whole potential blog post, so thanks for the inspiration Lucille and I will just say petrichor and Dijon mustard.

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    Replies
    1. And thank you for the new (to me) word which I will be using as the inspiration for a blog post!

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    2. I've been waiting for the opportunity to work it into a sentence.

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    3. Is there a word for the scent of rain on lilac? I had completely forgotten the scent of privet, which is a memory of childhood.

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    4. It is particularly linked for me with the smell of melting tarmac as I walked slowly up the steep road from the corner shop with a King Cone.

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  13. Oh dear, I should be here for days if I started to list so I shan't.

    Good word Sue - new to me too.

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  14. The breeze wafting down our road from Exmoor early in the morning; anything with real sandalwood; freshly-brewed tea. My beloved grandmother's suitcases when she arrived to stay for a while - although later in life I realised it was actually the smell of her new cotton summer dresses....
    Just a tiny selection!

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